The model of all indoor orienteering: Stockholm Indoor Cup

Orienteering

From time to time, the captioned competition turns up in orienteering websites and discussions. Yes, this is the Stockholm Indoor Cup, which has inspired orienteers around the world to organise similar events.

The competition usually takes place in a school: (note that in many Germanic languages the term gymnasium refers to a high school)

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A few rules need to be observed:

  • All staircases are marked with orange plus a letter to identify them across all floors, e.g. the staircase K in the above map will bring you to the 1st, 2nd and 3rd floor.
  • The violet lines, which block the corridors in the map, must not be crossed, and they are taped exactly as it is (so no chance of accidental disqualification). (The hatched and solid violet areas, of course, are also out of bounds.) This makes the entire school a maze, and has the effect of lengthening the course plus throwing in a lot of fun.
  • Unidirectional arrows in orange are one way (2/F, near staircase G) are one-way, with one-way signs and “do-not-enter” sign posted onsite.
  • The green rectangles and squares are tables.
  • That the library shelves (2/F, the room that control 20 is in) are marked in grey, DOESN’T mean you can cross them like canopies in sprint maps.

Note that this school has the main entrance on 2/F. (1/F being the “basement” that is level with the ground outside)

The following is an illustration of how controls 3 to 4 can be tackled, using staircases L->K->E->G. (I lost upwards of 5 minutes on this leg, taking two full loops to get out of the error)

sthlm inomhus ilustration

A few more photos:

To be continued tomorrow (day 2).

 

 

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In transition

Music, Orienteering

The HKOC Open Sprint Event was finally over last Sunday, successfully held save for major delays resulting from a faulty control unit and the resulting surge in results workload. This was my first orienteering event as organizer and I must thank every official and competitor who helped keep the event running, among other people who made it possible, and I apologize for all the hiccups.

Course-wise, much more needs to be learnt (this is my first time setting ranking courses), especially on setting sprints, my favourite orienteering discipline. Another issue is the enforcement of ISSOM-passability – balancing fairness and performance and not have multiple angry disqualified competitors turning up in front of you is tremendously important on the success of a sprint event, especially when it’s part of the Hong Kong team selection. (It is – the selection result is due in May.)

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These two years saw a near-complete change of me from musician-orienteer to orienteer-musician. This has tremendously affected my habits, life, goals and aspirations as my search in identity continues. With graduation imminent I have come to miss the music student’s way of life. The future, to me, is still a vast unknown – but to continue on a music career it’s always a sine qua non to learn continually from other people, other experiences and other cultures.

Composition is a tricky discipline in that it necessarily involves some subjective aesthetic judgement. Thus it’s always a good idea to keep trying and finding new opportunities. Networking is a big area to improve given my introvert character. (Don’t wait for opportunities; find actively.)

It is also worth reminding that changing the living/learning/working environment every while or so is an important part in lifelong learning. Getting stuck at a place for too long is seldom a good idea.

And of course, a self-composed piece to be performed by the Hong Kong Philharmonic is something I could hardly have dreamed of as a boy, which is however going to happen next Saturday! So do come and listen! (And meet Maestro Sheng)